Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program

The City of Kenmore desires to review and address the transportation needs and concerns in the neighborhoods throughout the city. During the 2015-16 budgeting process, the City set aside funds to create and implement Neighborhood Transportation Plans. This work will be performed collaboratively with the citizens who live, work and play in Kenmore’s neighborhoods. Quick-build, fundable and effective improvements will be identified to help enhance mobility and safety. This Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program (NTPP) will:

  • Delineate the neighborhoods of Kenmore based on the existing transportation network and topography
  • Hold public meetings and web-based outreach to identify issues and solutions
  • Develop and screen operational and physical enhancements and projects
  • Create a prioritized map of improvements for implementation in each neighborhood
  • Implementation of projects within the budget provided

Neighborhood meetings will start in September of 2015 and continue through 2016.  Notification of these meetings will be via mailed postcards and this website.

 

View Completed Neighborhood Plans

 

Overview of the Program

What are the Program Neighborhoods?

How will the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program work?

What concerns are being addressed in the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program?

What tools are available in the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program?

How is this different from the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Policy?

What roads will the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program cover?

How do I get involved?

Are there other ways for me to provide input?

What is the schedule of meetings?


 

What are the Program Neighborhoods?

The program neighborhoods are defined by how residents use our city’s residential roads to get around Kenmore. The neighborhood boundaries are intended to group together neighbors who use the same residential and collector streets and have similar concerns for the mobility and connectivity of their part of Kenmore.  To find your neighborhood, click to access the City’s GIS map and turn on the “neighborhoods” layer by clicking on "layers" in the top blue menu bar and selecting "Transportation Neighborhoods". You can then navigate the map to find your property. You can click your property to get a pop-up window identifying your neighborhood.

 

How will the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program work?

The Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program will bring together neighbors to identify the barriers to mobility, and problems or potential problems with vehicle speeds and volumes that the neighborhood would like to address.  City staff will help facilitate the discussion and help neighbors to prioritize issues and apply available tools that can be used within each neighborhood’s available budget.

Two meetings will be held at City Hall and at other locations throughout Kenmore to gather input on issues to address.  At these meetings, city staff will guide the discussion of tools that can be used to address these issues.  A collaborative discussion will help the process of identifying favored approaches to address concerns. We are looking for everyone’s input, and will also be gathering feedback online.  In order to move your neighborhood through the NTPP process, there needs to be a representative level of in-person participation at the first meeting.

After reviewing feedback received in meetings and from online submissions, recommendations will be reviewed for effectiveness, constructability and sound design practice.  At a third and final meeting for each neighborhood, City staff will help neighbors to prioritize and assemble a final map of projects for implementation. 

Click this link to see a sample completed Neighborhood Transportation Plan.

 

What concerns are being addressed in the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program?

The program will solicit input on any transportation topic of concern, including:

  • Vehicle speed: Speeds are a product of driver comfort with the physical road environment, expectation and familiarity. The perception of speed can be deceptive, and occasionally drivers are adhering to safe speed limits, but appear to be traveling too fast. If speeds are excessive, tools are available which can alter the road environment in both subtle and obvious ways to slow traffic without making the ride uncomfortable or increasing ambient noise. Other tools can change the familiar operation of a road and draw a driver’s attention, causing them to slow and proceed with more caution.
    Ease of walking and cycling: Not all transportation occurs by vehicle, and residential streets should be accommodating for all modes of travel. While not all signs, markings and treatments are appropriate in all situations, there are opportunities to make it easier to travel by modes other than vehicles on residential streets.
  • Missing connections: A part of the accommodation of non-vehicle travel is ensuring that adequate pathways are available. Some locations in residential areas are separated by impassable terrain or vegetation, or lack appropriate walkways. There may be opportunities to address these missing connections in the program.
  • Sight Distance: A full view of vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists is important to safety and mobility. Limited sight distance due to vegetation, parking or roadway physical characteristics can be addressed in the NTPP through a number of available tools.
  • Traffic Control: Signing, striping and delineators are an essential part of driver and non-driver familiarity with roadway conditions and operations. Improvements to these communication tools can be made through the NTPP.

These are some examples of information that will be sought from citizens as part of the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program. Any other transportation-related concern can be raised through the program, and there may be tools to find a solution as part of a neighborhood’s final collaborative plan.

 

What tools are available in the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program?

The program includes a wide variety of tools to enhance transportation within a neighborhood.  Tools from this list or other creative ideas may be appropriate solutions to issues raised.  The list below includes links to pages which show examples of each of these improvements and in some cases, pictures of these improvements in place.

For the physical devices identified above, the City is encouraging the use of temporary barriers as part of the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program.  Concrete planters and extruded curb can provide the desired physical barrier along with an opportunity for citizens to contribute, through voluntary landscaping efforts, to the aesthetics of their neighborhood.

The program discourages three specific tools; 20 mile per hour speed limits, stop signs, and children at play signs.  These tools have been shown, through research, to be ineffective in addressing traffic concerns and in some cases, contribute to additional unsafe conditions for drivers and residents.  Other tools are more effective at addressing transportation issues.  Click for more information on the reasoning and research for this policy.

 

How is this different from the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Policy?

The Neighborhood Calming policy will remain in place during and after the NTPP to react to situations where citizens request review of specific roadways and concerns.  The calming policy will also remain the primary method to address concerns on arterial roadway, as those are excluded from the NTPP.  During the NTPP process, scheduling of meetings may require a concern to be addressed through the calming policy, instead of the NTPP. 

The NTPP is a proactive program, intended to alleviate the need to use the calming policy.  Future development patterns and issues that arise outside of the scheduling of the NTPP meetings may require the use of the calming program.  The data thresholds and requirements of the calming program will remain in place for issues that use that program.  Those thresholds are relaxed in the NTPP.

 

What roads will the Neighborhood Transportation Plan Program cover?

The program will address concerns on residential roadways and collectors.  Roads designated as arterials in the Transportation Element of the Kenmore Comprehensive Plan, private roads, and SR 522 are not eligible for improvement in the NTPP.  Issues involving these roadways can be raised, but will be addressed outside of this program. 

The NTPP will also not address downtown Kenmore.  With few residential, public, non-arterial roadways, the downtown area, which can be seen in the City’s GIS map, will not be included in the program.

 

How do I get involved?

Attend your neighborhood’s meeting!  Announcements on this website, electronic and print newsletters, and other public sources will be made regarding meeting dates and times. 

Get together with your neighbors ahead of time and discuss issues to raise at our meetings.  There will be three meetings in the process of developing each neighborhood’s plan.  The first two meetings will be to identify issues, solutions and priorities.  The third meeting, following City staff’s engineering evaluation, will be the final prioritization of improvements and creation of the map for implementation.

Get familiar with the available toolbox of solutions that can be used, or come with your own suggestions!  City staff is open to evaluating new ideas for safety and sound engineering design.

Use the available radar devices at City Hall to monitor your street ahead of time and bring your data with you!  While the NTPP will not be entirely data-driven, the City will require some data collection prior to installation of physical devices to ensure that available budgets are being spent in the most effective manner possible.

 
Are there other ways for me to provide input?

We welcome everyone’s opinion!  If you cannot make it to a meeting in person, online input will be collected via the NTPP feedback page.  You must provide your address in order to ensure that your comments are allocated to the correct neighborhood. 

Online comments will be considered in the creation of a neighborhood’s plan, but the final input on prioritization and appropriate solutions will be at the in-person meetings.

 

What is the schedule of meetings?

Neighborhood meetings started in September 2015 and will continue into 2016.  Implementation will begin shortly after the completion of a neighborhoods’ third meeting and final plan. Click here to view a map of Kenmore neighborhoods. All meetings will take place at the Kenmore City Hall, Community Room.

 

  • Green South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Tuesday, September 15, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Third meeting: Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Purple South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Thursday, September 17, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Due to no participation, no further meetings scheduled
  • Blue North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Thursday, September 24, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, October 29, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Third meeting: Thursday, January 21, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Grey South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Tuesday, September 29, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Tuesday, November 3, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Third meeting: Thursday, January 28, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Green North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, November 5, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Third meeting: Tuesday, January 26, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Pink South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Teal North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, January 21, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Third meeting: Thursday, March 3, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Orange North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Tuesday, December 8, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Tuesday, January 26, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Third meeting: Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Teal South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, December 9, 2015, 7:00pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, January 28, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Third meeting: Thursday, March 10, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Grey North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, March 2, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Second meeting: Tuesday, May 3, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Yellow North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Tuesday, March 15, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Second meeting: Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Purple North Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Thursday, March 3, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, May 5, 2016, 6:30pm
  • Orange South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, March 10, 2016, 7:30pm
    • Second meeting: Tuesday, May 3, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Yellow South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 7:30pm
    • Second meeting: Thursday, May 5, 2016, 7:30pm
  • Blue South Neighborhood
    • First meeting: Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 6:30pm
    • Second meeting: Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 7:30pm

 

If you live in one of these neighborhoods, you will receive a post card notifying you of the upcoming first meeting. 

If you would like to see what neighborhood you are in, please click over to the City’s GIS map and turn on the “neighborhoods” layer by clicking on "layers" in the top blue menu bar and selecting "Transportation Neighborhoods". You can then navigate the map to find your property.

 

 

 

Last updated: Mon, 05/02/2016 - 1:47pm